Product Design Newsletter

Insights from fields like user experience, agile development, marketing and of course product design.

Product Design Newsletter

Issue from

Jan Mikula Jan Mikula • Weekly

UX Planet

UX Planet

Best Practices in Mobile App Design in 2020

Optimal mobile app design is all about personalized communication, a friendly voice, and intuitive interaction. In other words, design that doesn’t require users to think much and focuses on emotions, motivations, and needs.

Do you want to create a technologically advanced product that speaks to your users’ heart? Then you’re in the right place.

In this article, you’ll dip your toe into the best practices in mobile app design in 2020 and learn how they can boost sales and retain users.

Read the article (8 min read)
UX Collective

UX Collective

How the shape of a button can influence user perception

A quick guide.

Buttons are all around us in UI design. From sign-up screens to app permissions to checkouts, they’re everywhere you look. Now there are button styles that may or may not reflect your brand so before trying that button to your design, think of the meaning behind those buttons. Let me discuss the types of buttons and their meaning behind it.

Read the article (1 min read)
UX Collective

UX Collective

Is Neumorphism a trend or design nonsense?

Is Neumorphism a trend or design nonsense?

Neumorphism is an upward trend in 2019–2020, a style to which we owe the appearance of dribbble. Already the fact that this style was born on this site, should have warned the thinking designer: many know that dribbble — a collection of often insanely beautiful, but absolutely not working design. Design for likes — that’s what dribbble is all about. In my opinion, it is not surprising that neumorphism is completely unviable, impractical and unrealistic style in design. What my opinion is based on is this material.

Read the article (4 min read)

Inspiration

Muzli

Muzli

The Importance of Side Hustle

Digital Design Collection

Why, how and what I gain of doing side-projects

The side projects have been playing an essential role in my career in design. The sheer interest of nuanced idea has significance to my side projects that I have been doing for a long time.

WHY

In 2015, I was working with a food-tech startup. I was responsible for user experience design and user interface design. Nowadays, it is called the Product Designer. Initially, it was quite challenging to cope up with the various responsibilities. My work mostly jumped off between research, communication and design. A couple of months passed, and I settled with startup chaos of uncertainty.

Read the article (4 min read)
UX Planet

UX Planet

Top UI/UX Design Works for Inspiration — #98

UI & UX Design Inspiration

Every day most digital designers look for inspiration on sources like Dribbble. In a large stream of the works, it is very easy to miss some quality shots with small number of likes and comments.

We decided to change that and every week showcase some of the recent cool shots of young designers who didn’t get much attention of the community. Here they are:

MOBILE BANKING APP MOTION
👨‍🎨 Ayoub kada

MEDICINE DELIVERY APP
👨‍🎨 Purrweb UI

PRODUCT CARD
👨‍🎨 Roman Salo
👥 obys

Read the article (1 min read)
UX Planet

UX Planet

The Creative 404 (Error) Pages!

There’s no limit to what creativity should look like, even when it’s just the error page of your website.
“PAGE NOT FOUND” is probably the most annoying thing to look at on a screen, but not when it’s creative and interactive. The article showcases some of the creatively inspired 404 pages you can see in 2020.

Just to give you some nostalgia, here is one of the older 404 pages you must have visited at some point.

Showcasing some of the best 404 pages:

Read the article (2 min read)

Research papers

NN Group

NN Group

Passive Information Acquisition on the Increase

Summary: People increasingly discover critical information online without actively searching for it, but such information has poor context and may have credibility issues.

Recently, we conducted a large-scale survey to understand how people make important decisions based on online information. The survey replicated and expanded a study conducted by Xerox PARC researchers in 1997.

Compared to the original study, we found that critical internet usage today involves more activities directed towards gaining an understanding of a topic than 22 years ago. We also noted that a fair percentage of the critical information was acquired passively, meaning that the user did not set out to find that information.

Read the article (8 min read)
NN Group

NN Group

How People Read Online: New and Old Findings

Summary: Looking back at findings from a series of eyetracking studies over 13 years, we see that fundamental scanning behaviors remain constant, even as designs change.

The more things change, the more they stay the same. 

We recently published the 2nd edition of our How People Read Online report, almost 15 years after the 1stedition was published. Looking back over the findings from the 5 eyetracking studies conducted for these editions, we can trace how online reading behaviors have changed (or not).

We’ve been saying this since 1997People rarely read online — they’re far more likely to scan than read word for word. That’s one fundamental truth of online information-seeking behavior that hasn’t changed in 23 years and which has substantial implications for how we create digital content.

Read the article (8 min read)

Other

UX Collective

UX Collective

Project planning for designers: don’t focus on features; plan for the purpose

When planning, we often can’t see the forest for the trees. Design teams can be the rangers.

Historic image of forest ranger with map on a mountain overlooking a forested landscape.

“I see, you cannot see the wood for the trees.”
– John Heywood, The Proverbs of John Heywood: 1546.

PProject plans are a particular species of spreadsheet best suited for very few of Myers-Brigg’s personality types. I am not one of them. A familiar feeling often washes over me as soon as I see a one. If User Experience and Design planning was a game of poker, (the comparison can feel accurate at times) then the project plan would be the tell. The feeling is similar to walking into a room in the middle of someone telling a good story. ‘Wait.” I want to say. “Stop. Go back. Start over.”

Read the article (5 min read)
UX Collective

UX Collective

Re-imagining Terms & Conditions: can we make them (more) legible and transparent?

How might we do for Terms & Conditions / Privacy Policies (PP) what Creative Commons did for IP by building a visual iconography?

TLDR:

T&C / PP suck and are a pivotal moment in skewing the relationship between digital providers and users. How might we re-imagine these documents to be legible, accessible, and transparent? Can a visual iconography help communicate what you’re consenting to?

Read the article (3 min read)
UX Collective

UX Collective

5 lessons I learned by designing for accessibility

Illustration of woman in wheelchair and man holding white cane

18 months ago, I joined the Android team at Google as its first Android Accessibility Design Lead.

Now, you might think I must have some ironclad qualifications in accessibility in order to be handed the responsibility of designing accessible experiences for the nearly 3 billion Android devices out there.

The honest truth was, I barely had any knowledge of accessibility beyond color contrast ratios and tap target sizes. I had a drive for designing for social good (something I’ve been passionate about throughout my career), and sadly, the team simply was not able to find anyone more qualified than that — an empty enthusiasm. That speaks to how scarce accessibility resources are, even at one of the largest tech companies in the world.

Read the article (11 min read)
NN Group

NN Group

Slow UI: Pace Interaction to Increase Understanding

Summary: Overly fast interfaces are error prone and encourage users to rush through websites and other systems. Design to reduce interaction speed and increase users’ understanding and task success.

There is no doubt that the traditional emphasis on speed in user-interface design has gone overboard. Yes, there’s something to be said for fast response times and web pages that download immediately. And for decades, one of the 5 measurable quality attributes of usability has been efficiency: Once users have learned the design, how quickly can they perform tasks?

Read the article (6 min read)

That's it. You read the whole issue.

Subscribe to newsletter

  • Read the best content selected by Jan Mikula Jan Mikula.
  • You will receive newsletter in your inbox Every Wednesday at 12:00.
  • You can also subscribe using RSS feed.

Modern news platform
for demanding readers

Subscribe to thematic newsletters prepared by professional editors.

  • Read your newsletters at regular time you want. E.g. every day at 9am.
  • We update your timeline only every 3 hours. Because that's sane.
  • No notifications. No endless scrolling. No addiction and FOMO.