Product Design Newsletter

Insights from fields like user experience, agile development, marketing and of course product design.

Product Design Newsletter

Issue from

Jan Mikula Jan Mikula • Weekly

A List Apart

A List Apart

Navigating the Awkward: A Framework for Design Conversations

We’ve all been there. A client or coworker shows us this amazing thing they (and maybe their entire team) have worked on for hours or weeks. They are so proud of it. It’s new or maybe it just looks new. They may or may not ask you what you think—but you’re there to experience it. And your brain quietly screams.

As an experienced designer, you often have an intuitive reaction and can quickly spot bad designs; they may be visually incongruent, poorly structured, confusing, lack social awareness, or look like they are trying too hard.

If your initial response is so negative that it slips through into your expression or voice or body language, it can completely sabotage any possibility of buy-in. And, far more seriously, it can ruin the relationship of trust and collaboration you’re building with that person. 

Read the article (7 min read)

UX Research

Smashing Magazine

Smashing Magazine

Ethical Considerations In UX Research: The Need For Training And Review

We rely on UX research, collecting data from our users, to inform our UX process. As the Nielsen Norman Group aptly states “UX without user research is not UX”. That doesn’t mean that all UX teams conduct research the same way, or have specific roles dedicated to UX research. This means everyone on a UX team has the potential to play a role in collecting and analyzing data. For example, designers might need to conduct their own usability testing. PMs and developers might assist with analyzing interview data to identify themes.

Read the article (11 min read)
UX Planet

UX Planet

How to run a virtual user journey mapping workshop

A step by step process and Miro template

Image for post

With WFH going for months without a definitive end, our team had to adjust how we collaborate and communicate. Long gone are the days when we could hold the in-person user testing, brainstorming, and workshop sessions that were once essential to our workflow. Now, we collaborate and conduct design critiques over video call and watch each other’s cursors zoom around Figma screens.

Read the article (2 min read)

Usability

UX Planet

UX Planet

Top 10 User Frustrations on Web

And how to fix (most of) them

What are the most frustrating things that you face on the web today? Vitaly Friedman of Smashing Magazine did a great job summarizing all key user frustrations in 2020.

In this article, I want to overview my list of the ten most critical frustrations and share practical tips on how to overcome them:

1. Small-sized text

Despite the recent popularity of video format, most information on the web is still in written form. That’s why

Good readability and legibility are essential for good user experience.

Here are a few practical tips for you to follow when working with text:

  • Font size should be minimum 16px. 16px is a good place to start but remember that the bigger the screen size, the larger the text.
  • Aim for line-height to be 1.5em or 1.6em for optimal readability.
  • Always view your designs on an actual device.
Read the article (3 min read)

Inspiration

UX Planet

UX Planet

The State of UX for 2021

UX design is a dynamic field that brings us new trends every year, and the last twelve months are no exception. The global COVID-19 pandemic and national lockdowns have brought a sudden change to the way we interact with the world, both digital and real. People have not only started to spend more time online; they’ve started to think and behave differently. Naturally, the coronavirus situation has impacted the current state of UX and formed a foundation for the UX trends of 2021.

This article outlines the main 2021 user experience trends that we believe will dominate and are likely to shape the year to come. Take a look and see which trends you can make use of to outrun your competitors and stand out from the crowd.

Read the article (4 min read)
UX Planet

UX Planet

Top UI/UX Design Works for Inspiration — #134

UI & UX Design Inspiration

All of these are great UI/IX works of artists and designers. They are good sources of inspiration for our users. Please feel free to comment on this design gallery, we would love to hear from you!

3D SWIPE UI
👨‍🎨 Gleb Kuznetsov✈ Gleb Kuznetsov

Image for post

BRAND ONBOARDING UI
👨‍🎨 Gleb Kuznetsov✈ Gleb Kuznetsov

TASKEZ: PRODUCTIVITY APP IOS14 UI KIT — 03
👨‍🎨 Tran Mau Tri Tam ✪ Tran Mau Tri Tam
👥 UI8

Image for post

3D LETTER UNVEILING SURFACE — VISUAL CONCEPT
👨‍🎨 Minh Pham ✪

Read the article (1 min read)
UX Planet

UX Planet

10 Places To Search for Design Inspiration

Get inspired by creators around the world

Image for post

One way or another, we’ve all found ourselves somewhere in the time and space of the internet looking for inspiration, whether it be writing, illustration, web design, home decor, or any other type of industry and art.

The world wide web has given us many excellent tools that help us every day, in many different ways. When it comes to Design, we can find numerous different platforms where creators from all around the world can share their creations with others and showcase their work.

I love looking for different styles and seeing people’s unique creations to get inspired for my work and learn more about the possibilities of various tools, per example.

Read the article (2 min read)
UX Planet

UX Planet

Practical Tips for Creating Smooth Website Navigation Experience

Image for post

Practical Tips for Creating Smooth Website Navigation Experience

Explore 5 key areas for improvement

Navigation is one of the most critical aspects of product design. People rely on navigation to find content and features. Helping users navigate should be a top priority for every app or website. After all, no matter how much time you invest in crafting good content and features, all this work will be useless if the visitor won’t be able to find them.

1. Design navigation that matches user mental models

  • Figure out how people navigate your website. Use web analytics to learn what visitors are looking for on your website. Review user sessions to find key user flows and understand what types of tasks visitors complete on your website.
Read the article (3 min read)

UX Science & Theories

NN Group

NN Group

The Lawn Mower Eyetracking Pattern for Scanning Comparison Tables

Summary: Users are likely to methodically scan comparison tables row by row, from right to left and back again.

On pages with distinct cells of content, people often scan those cells in a lawn mower pattern: they begin in the top left cell, move to right until the end of the row, then drop down to last cell of the next row and move back to the left until the end of the row; and so on. In our eyetracking research, we observed this pattern on many types of pages and tables (especially zigzag layouts) but most frequently on comparison tables. This article focuses on how the lawn mower pattern applies to comparison tables.

In a lawn mower pattern, the user’s gaze moves from left to right, then down, then from right to left, then down. 
Read the article (5 min read)
NN Group

NN Group

Help and Documentation: The 10th Usability Heuristic

Summary: Interface help comes in two forms: proactive and reactive. Proactive help is intended to get users familiar with an interface while reactive help is meant for troubleshooting and gaining system proficiency.

Download a free poster of Jakob’s Usability Heuristic #10 at the bottom of this article.

The 10th usability heuristic states:

Even though it is better if the system can be used without documentation, it may be necessary to provide help and documentation. Any such information should be easy to search, focused on the user’s task, list concrete steps to be carried out, and not be too large.

Read the article (5 min read)
NN Group

NN Group

8 Design Guidelines for Complex Applications

Summary: Despite great diversity in the workflows and end users supported by complex applications, these 8 design guidelines are generally applicable.

What Is a Complex Application?

We’ve previously defined a complex application as any application supporting the broad, unstructured goals or nonlinear workflows of highly trained users in specialized domains. Complex apps certainly vary in the type of workflows and end users they support — from research scientists to military professionals to financial analysts, for example — but they often share similar qualities. For example, complex apps frequently:

Read the article (5 min read)
NN Group

NN Group

The Principle of Common Region: Containers Create Groupings

Summary: In visual design, elements within the same boundary are perceived as related.

Gestalt principles guide how people visually perceive the world — including digital interfaces. Specifically, these principles explain how people decide whether several individual elements are part of the same group and, thus, are related in some way. This knowledge helps them understand and interact with the world in general, and also applies to controls and content on screens.

The original set of Gestalt principles was discovered in the first half of the twentieth century and includes proximity, similarity, and closure. Later research at the end of the twentieth century added a few more grouping principles to the list discovered initially by the Gestalt psychologists. Among these, perhaps the most relevant for UX is that of common region.

Read the article (4 min read)

That's it. You read the whole issue.

Subscribe to newsletter

  • Read the best content selected by Jan Mikula Jan Mikula.
  • You will receive newsletter in your inbox Every Wednesday at 15:00.
  • You can also subscribe using RSS feed.

Modern news platform
for demanding readers

Subscribe to thematic newsletters prepared by professional editors.

  • Read your newsletters at regular time you want. E.g. every day at 9am.
  • We update your timeline only every 3 hours. Because that's sane.
  • No notifications. No endless scrolling. No addiction and FOMO.